How old is earth based on radiometric dating predating speed dating houston

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Meanwhile, Arthur Holmes (1890-1964) was finishing up a geology degree at the Imperial College of Science in London where he developed the technique of dating rocks using the uranium-lead method.

By applying the technique to his oldest rock, Holmes proposed that the Earth was at least 1.6 billion years old.

From the fragments, scientists calculated the relative abundances of elements that formed as radioactive uranium decayed over billions of years."It was not until the 1950s that the age of the universe was finally revised and put safely beyond the age of the Earth, which had at last reached its true age of 4.56 billion years," Lewis said.

"Physicists suddenly gained a new respect for geologists."For the record, the universe is now thought to have debuted, at least in its latest incarnation, about 13.7 billion ago.

The question of the age of the earth has produced heated discussions on Internet debate boards, TV, radio, in classrooms, and in many churches, Christian colleges, and seminaries. Let’s give a little history of where these two basic calculations came from and which worldview is more reasonable. Of course, the Bible doesn’t say explicitly anywhere, “The earth is 6,000 years old.” Good thing it doesn’t; otherwise it would be out of date the following year.

But we wouldn’t expect an all-knowing God to make that kind of a mistake. In essence, He gave us a “birth certificate.” For example, using a personal birth certificate, a person can calculate how old he is at any point. Genesis 1 says that the earth was created on the first day of creation ().

Our planet was pegged at a youthful few thousand years old by Bible readers (by counting all the "begats" since Adam) as late as the end of the 19th century, with physicist Lord Kelvin providing another nascent estimate of 100 million years.

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Pièrre La Place imagined an indefinite but very long history.Their dates of only thousands of years are good support for the biblical date of about 6,000 years, but not for billions of years. The approximate 6,000-year age for the earth was challenged only rather recently, beginning in the late 18th century.These opponents of the biblical chronology essentially left God out of the picture.Smith and Cuvier believed untold ages were needed for the formation of rock layers. No powers are to be employed that are not natural to the globe, no action to be admitted except those of which we know the principle.12 This viewpoint is called naturalistic uniformitarianism, and it excludes any major catastrophes such as Noah’s flood.Hutton said he could see no geological evidence of a beginning of the earth; and building on Hutton’s thinking, Lyell advocated “millions of years.” From these men and others came the consensus view that the geologic layers were laid down slowly over long periods of time based on the rates at which we see them accumulating today. Though some, such as Cuvier and Smith, believed in multiple catastrophes separated by long periods of time, the uniformitarian concept became the ruling dogma in geology.

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